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New Post 1/5/2015 1:42 PM
User is offline vlookup
39 posts
9th Level Poster


Mainly working in a RDBMS 

I was just wondering if any other BA's out there find themselves working mainly in a database engine?  I reviewed this board and it looks like real BA's design formal documents and create value proposition to senior leadership. 

I find myself working in SSMS designing stored procedures, triggers, reports, tables, views etc.  What type of analyst am I? 

I use Excel and write some VBA same with Access, that's a little different but I mainly work in SQL Server. 

I elicit and gather requirements, but then I do the work lol.  I have managed a few app dev projects which was cool, but that's more of a PM role, which doesn't seem to exists anymore. 

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. 

 
New Post 1/9/2015 10:55 PM
User is offline NitWitNick
259 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Mainly working in a RDBMS 

In the past there were specific people and titles for specific jobs ... Analyst, Programmer, Systems Analyst, Tape Librarian, Operator ... etc. but over the years and more simplicity and automation of systems ... companies started to realize they didn't need a dozen people to do separate jobs ... they started to combine them and wanted people who could do all of it.

In Most of the contracts I've been on over the last decade or so, there are No one trick ponies ... the contractors were well versed in End-To-End systems development ... they could go meet with people, see what they want, design, develop, test and deploy the application after user acceptance. so, In today's world, you are more important to be a Jack-Of-All-Trades ... someone who can take a project and do it on their own if needed or work within a team, etc. (with Minimal Supervision).


In the Big Bank Merger I did several years ago ... all of the people I worked with had Multiple Certifications ... from programming languages, Business Analysts, ITIL, Project Manager, CPA, CSM, CPO, etc. Including certified teachers for user training.


"that's more of a PM role, which doesn't seem to exists anymore. "

Project managers are still around, but ... PM roles are now becoming a combination of a PM / BSA (technical background with Agile experience) ... and some certifications for Agile are Certified Scrum Master (CSM) and Certified Product Owner (CPO).


"What type of analyst am I?"

If you are designing and developing stored procedures, triggers, reports, tables, views etc. and implementing them in SQL Server... I would say you are a Programmer / Business Systems Analyst / DBA / Change Management. Which to me is much more valuable than just a Non-Technical BA who does not understand all that stuff. For one person, you can do a lot of stuff and the company saves money on you ... they don't need multiple people.


Don't downplay your technical background ... and remember in your resume, mention that you can communicate to Technical and Non-Technical people.

 
New Post 1/12/2015 11:37 AM
User is offline vlookup
39 posts
9th Level Poster


Re: Mainly working in a RDBMS 

Nick thanks for proving a lot of GREAT information.  This was a very enlightening read you crafted, thanks!  

I always felt like I was a "Business System Analyst" to be honest so that's really crazy you actually posted that as well.  I'm not really sure what a change manager does, but DBA is clear as well as programmers.  Most of the code I write is set theory based, not procedural.  

Nick cheers m8 thanks for the follow up you made my day.

 

 
New Post 1/13/2015 6:15 PM
User is offline NitWitNick
259 posts
5th Level Poster


Re: Mainly working in a RDBMS 

"I'm not really sure what a change manager does"


When a place has a system in place and the users have decided they would like some changes to it to make it more efficient, the vendor / programmers make the changes and it has to be put into production ... you make the plan to do that ... including any training that might be required for all users to be familiar with the changes.

Sometimes there are committees that review requested changes and either approve them or deny them.


Change Management

The main goal of Change Management is for all changes that need to be made to IT infrastructure and services to be performed and implemented correctly by ensuring standard procedures are followed.


 
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