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New Post 2/7/2022 6:58 AM
User is offline Victoria_89
5 posts
10th Level Poster


What's the difference between a Project Manager and a Product Manager? 

As I see there's much confusion in understanding what these roles are about, could you guys please help me?

 
New Post 3/11/2022 3:41 PM
User is offline hims111
9 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: What's the difference between a Project Manager and a Product Manager? 

Hello,

Stated below are a few key differences between a Product and Project Manager in my opinion:

  1. A Product Manager is responsible for strategy and delivery, whereas a Project Manager is only responsible for delivery.
  2. A Product Manager interacts with customers and end users to understand their requirements and issues; however, a Project Manager interacts with the project team and does not interact with end-users or customers.
  3. A Product Manager defines the “what” and “why” of the product; however, a Project Manager implements it.

There are certain skills that are transferable between the two roles.

Kind Regards,

Hims

 

 

 
New Post 5/18/2022 4:34 AM
User is offline Riri
9 posts
10th Level Poster


Re: What's the difference between a Project Manager and a Product Manager? 

A product manager is in charge of a product from its inception to its conclusion. This means they create a product's vision, direct any revisions, and ensure the product meets client expectations until it is discontinued. Product management, unlike project management, rarely has a defined beginning and finish. Product managers can take on high-level tasks like leading a team in larger firms. A product manager in a smaller company could conduct more hands-on work, such as market research or project management.

Because the post of product manager is still relatively new, exact duties might vary greatly from firm to company and team to team. However, a product manager often accomplishes the following:

Defines essential product success measures.

Understands customer requirements and communicates them to the product team.

Develops and pursues product strategy in collaboration with cross-functional teams such as engineering, design, and marketing.

Through market analysis and other research, discovers methods to improve or expand a product.

Monitors the product's performance.

A project manager is in charge of a project from beginning to end. A project is a collection of tasks aimed towards achieving a specified goal. Projects might be large, such as the construction of a new building, or small, such as the implementation of a new tool for a team. A project manager is someone who organizes these initiatives from start to finish by forming teams, defining timetables, managing finances, and communicating with stakeholders. A project usually has a clearly defined beginning and finish.

Project managers can perform the following duties:

Establish essential milestones such as project scope, timing, and cost estimates.

Collaborate and communicate with leadership and stakeholders on a regular basis.

Create and manage processes for project modifications.

 
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