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New Post 11/18/2019 9:44 AM
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User is offline David Jacobs
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UML: Use Case diagram for Create Invoice 

Hello all
I've just joined Modern Analyst and would like to ask for some advice.
I want to draw a use case diagram for Create Invoice (this is an example I am working on for my own edification).
I have two use case ovals, Create Invoice (Header) and Create Invoice Line.
This may not be the best way to approach it but it seems to me to be a two-way extend relationship.
The user can create an invoice header and optionally create lines (or add lines later).
And the user can create invoice lines, sometimes having to create a header first where one does not exist.
In UML would this be best as Create Invoice without the detail or drawn as how?
I believe a two-way extend is not a recommended construct for use case diagrams.
Many thanks in advance for any thoughts.
David Jacobs, business analyst

 

 

 
New Post 12/12/2019 12:42 AM
User is offline Stewart F
114 posts
7th Level Poster


Re: UML: Use Case diagram for Create Invoice 

Hi David, 

To answer your question directly - I don't thin it really matters which way you create your diagram. 

You are quite right that there needs to be a step to create an Invoice 'shell' or 'header' as you call it. So I agree with that approach, especially based the fact that everything else that is created needs to go somewhere. 

So common sense would say it should be a two-way extend. However, you are also right that usually UML steers you away from having such a approach. The only thing I can suggest is to keep it at one - 'create the invoice shell' and then build on top of that. 

Failing that, rules are to be broken !!

 
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