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This principle supports #5. With limited resources, there is another strong tendency to have IT staff ‘wear multiple hats’ on a project, especially the Business Analyst who is asked to also be the Project Manager and/or Lead Tester. Rather than getting more than you are paying for, you get less as an IT Staffer skilled in one role spends more time ...
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This entry was published on May 22, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
Principle #4 - Pick the right project(s) for the business. At any one time, the IT department of an average company is running multiple projects. How did they get started? How were they even defined as a project that needed to be carried out? No one may actually know. In more chaotic environments, projects can start as a seed of an idea, pic...
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This entry was published on May 21, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
Principle #3: Use Architecture to describe the business, before and after projects. “Architecture” is becoming a more widely used term associated with Information Technology. The number of adjectives applied to the term seems endless: “Technical Architecture”, “Systems Architecture”, “Business Systems Arch...
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This entry was published on May 20, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
Principle #2: Projects change the business, so know the overall business first A never-ending discussion in IT circles is about how much IT staff need to know about the business that the information systems are supporting. It is high-lighted by every want-ad for an IT job that says previous experience in the employer’s industry is mandatory. Is d...
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This entry was published on May 16, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
Let’s look briefly at what each principle means or implies; which will serve as introductions to subsequent posts that will cover the principles in more detail. #1. There is always more work to be done than people to do it. Bordering on glibness, this principle summarizes the reality of virtually all organizations and activities, not just Informa...
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This entry was published on May 15, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
Like you, I have read my fair share of IT books and blogs, and each author has to decide how to best present what they are trying to communicate. One way is to describe the problems/opportunities of interest to the reader, then document the new approach or method that solves the problems, etc.; the reverse is to document the new approach/method fir...
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This entry was published on May 14, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
The premise of these blog entries is that the situation described in the previous post can change, but it is usually slow-going; or worse, there can be an immediate channge when your department is outsourced; it happens. In the meantime, what can be done to be “successful” in your average IT department in your average company? What has to be do...
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This entry was published on May 09, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
Day 1: I have recently made a major career change, moving from what I would now call a client company to a consulting company. It's an exciting change, but I don't expect to write about my new experiences at this time. However, I had also been spending some time writing an extended piece about my experiences over the years working ...
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This entry was published on May 08, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
This blog has been started because, like anyone who writes a bit for a living, I thought I had a book to write...so I did. This blog also hi-lights the arrival of lulu.com, a website that will publish your book with the 'tarnish' of a vanity presss. So, check both out at http://www.lulu.com/content/2088656 . The book is "Cascade - Better practice...
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This entry was published on May 07, 2008 / David Wright. Posted in Systems Analysis, Career as a Business Systems Analyst. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
The 5th edition of the Carnival of Business Analysts has been published at Better Projects. This edition is focused on Requirements Analysis.   This is a series of blog posts that collect other blog posts on topics themed around the BABOK knowledge areas. Edition 5 is on Requirements Analysis.   Previous editions include Loo...
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This entry was published on Dec 16, 2007 / Craig Brown. Posted in Requirements Analysis (BABOK KA) , Systems Analysis, Business Analysis. Bookmark the Permalink or E-mail it to a friend.
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